Mallory Boulware

This is a blog for PR Writing

Week 2: Ain’t ain’t a word, so I ain’t gonna say it! January 23, 2010

Filed under: COMM 4333,T.O.W. — mbboulware @ 8:50 am

I recently read a blog by Grammar girl that educated us on when, where and how the word “ain’t” came to be. One of the things I thought was interesting is that “ain’t” is actually in the dictionary. She says in her blog, though, that the only time it is ever really acceptable to use the word is in comedic context or when saying it in a quote. Other than that, it is just plain wrong. I was surprised to find out, too, that it is used as a conjugation of either the words “am I not” or “aren’t I.” I never knew what words it was technically replacing. The best option though, which is also the better option of the three, is the phrase: “isn’t that so.”

This blog was not only about the word “ain’t;” there were other conjugations that people get wrong. One of those was the word, “could’ve.” It is actually incorrect to pronounce it like “could-of.” Instead, it is supposed to be pronounced has “could-have.”

Isn’t it interesting that English gets adapted in a certain way? There are probably a plethora of words that are misused on a daily basis but yet they go unnoticed because it is such an adopted error. I would like to find out more words that people misuse; maybe I misuse them too! Does anyone have an idea as to what those words could be?

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2 Responses to “Week 2: Ain’t ain’t a word, so I ain’t gonna say it!”

  1. I think that this is really interesting. I remember in my 7th grade english class my teacher had a poster on her wall and it was talking all about how wrong it was to use the word ain’t. I did not know that the word ain’t is actually in the dictionary! Even as I type this comment, the word check on my computer is telling me that I need to change the word and replace it with something different. So, even our technology is saying that it is not correct. This make me wonder, do we think that saying the word ain’t is wrong simply because it is socially wrong? I mean if you think about it, if someone were to say ain’t in the business world, they would be looked at as a crazy hick. The word ain’t really is not acceptable in professional settings, and many other places as well.

    I completely agree with you that we misuse words on a daily basis. We become so immune to the errors in our grammar that it affects our speech in a huge way. When I was younger my mom would always correct my brother and me when we ended our sentence with the preposition, at. This made me think more about my grammar in my speech. It is easier for me to have good grammar in my writing, than in my speech, because I am a visual person, and I am able to see my mistakes more when they are in front of me.

    I enjoyed your blog!

  2. […] Hyperlink to blog post: Mallory Boulware […]


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